RULES FOR BEING A GIRL by Candace Bushnell and Katie Cotungo

From Katie Cotugno and author of Sex and the City Candace Bushnell comes this fierce and feisty exploration of feminism: standing up, speaking out and rewriting the rules.

Don’t be easy. Don’t give it up. Don’t be a prude. Don’t be cold. Don’t put him in the friendzone. Don’t act desperate. Don’t let things go too far. Don’t give him the wrong idea. Don’t blame him for trying. Don’t walk alone at night. But calm down! Don’t worry so much. Smile!

Marin is a smart, driven, popular girl – she’s headed for Brown when she graduates and has a brilliant career as a journalist ahead of her. Especially in the eyes of English teacher Mr Beckett. He spends a lot of time around Marin, and she thinks it’s harmless . . . until he kisses her.

No one believes Marin when she tells them what happened, so she does the only thing she can: she writes an article called ‘Rules for Being a Girl’ for the school paper to point out the misogyny and sexism that girls face every day. As things heat up at school and in her personal life, Marin must figure out how to take back the power and rewrite her own rules.


Title : Rules for Being a Girl
Author : Candace Bushnell & Katie Cotungo
Format : Paperback ARC
Page Count : 304
Genre : Contemporary YA
Publisher : Macmillan Children’s Books
Release Date : April 16, 2020

Reviewer : Micky
Rating : ★ ★ ★


Micky’s 3 star review

RULES FOR BEING A GIRL is a YA contemporary with themes of feminism woven throughout. It is the kind of book that I recommend reading the synopsis before you launch in because there are triggers and difficulties for some in the context. Even though nothing in this story triggered me, I still found the story direction hugely discomforting, probably because I’m a teacher and this got me so mad at the teacher in this book.

Marin, the protagonist was very likeable to me. She was just a genuine young woman, passionate, hard-working and fully taken advantage of. What I liked about Marin was how she went on to handle the events, she wasn’t a sudden explosion of anger, she was slower bubble of fury and injustice. Marin’s experiences opened her eyes to whole host of inequalities.

Now to the other characters in this book. Bex was vile, in fact, vile doesn’t quite suffice to describe him. On top of that, I was furious with Marin’s friend, even in the face of the unfurling of the storyline; I really struggled with this aspect of the story. Gray and Marin’s parents however, were highlights from a character perspective.

I definitely think there are life lessons for the YA age group in this story but I didn’t always love how the story played out. I did love the overall message and feminist themes.

Thank you to Macmillan Childrens/My Kind of Book for this early review copy.