ELEKTRA by Jennifer Saint

The House of Atreus is cursed. A bloodline tainted by a generational cycle of violence and vengeance. This is the story of three women, their fates inextricably tied to this curse, and the fickle nature of men and gods.

Clytemnestra
The sister of Helen, wife of Agamemnon – her hopes of averting the curse are dashed when her sister is taken to Troy by the feckless Paris. Her husband raises a great army against them and determines to win, whatever the cost.

Cassandra
Princess of Troy, and cursed by Apollo to see the future but never to be believed when she speaks of it. She is powerless in her knowledge that the city will fall.

Elektra
The youngest daughter of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon, Elektra is horrified by the bloodletting of her kin. But can she escape the curse, or is her own destiny also bound by violence?


Title : Elektra
Author : Jennifer Saint
Format : Physical
Page Count : 352
Genre : Historical/Greek Mythology
Publisher : Wildfire Publishing
Release Date : April 28, 2022

Reviewer : Micky
Rating : ★ ★ ★ ★


Micky’s 4 star review

Headlines:
Women, the powerful and powerless
Vengeance and bitterness
War and tragedy

Buckle up for another great retelling of a famous Greek mythological story but told from three key female perspectives, ones that are lesser known. The story revolved around Clytemenestra, Cassandra and finally Elektra and this was a tale told over decades. There’s much to immerse yourself into and it was an absorbing read filled with tragedy over three parts.

The book took the reader from Sparta to Troy and even other places briefly. I’ve read a fair few Greek mythology books around some of these events, especially Troy but Saint had a fresh perspective to bring on this, especially through Cassandra’s eyes. Expect all the brutality that comes with an authentic telling of these tales, especially violence and sexual violence towards women.

What was interesting about this story was how the women and girls did not stand together, they weren’t united in war, tragedy or loss. Grief drove some to all-consuming bitterness, others to violence and some to a sense of lethargy. There aren’t many characters to like for their personalities but I loved them for their dark sides and unexpected behaviours. Cassandra was the character that stuck out for me the most, the one I empathised with and felt most for.

This second book from Jennifer Saint was a consuming read, easy to digest despite the themes and I am a confirmed fan with this second offering.

Thank you to Wildfire/Headline Books for the early review copy.

ARIADNE by Jennifer Saint

A mesmerising retelling of the ancient Greek myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. Perfect for fans of CIRCE, A SONG OF ACHILLES, and THE SILENCE OF THE GIRLS.

As Princesses of Crete and daughters of the fearsome King Minos, Ariadne and her sister Phaedra grow up hearing the hoofbeats and bellows of the Minotaur echo from the Labyrinth beneath the palace. The Minotaur – Minos’s greatest shame and Ariadne’s brother – demands blood every year.

When Theseus, Prince of Athens, arrives in Crete as a sacrifice to the beast, Ariadne falls in love with him. But helping Theseus kill the monster means betraying her family and country, and Ariadne knows only too well that in a world ruled by mercurial gods – drawing their attention can cost you everything.

In a world where women are nothing more than the pawns of powerful men, will Ariadne’s decision to betray Crete for Theseus ensure her happy ending? Or will she find herself sacrificed for her lover’s ambition?

Ariadne gives a voice to the forgotten women of one of the most famous Greek myths, and speaks to their strength in the face of angry, petulant Gods. Beautifully written and completely immersive, this is an exceptional debut novel.


Title : Ariadne
Author : Jennifer Saint
Format : Paperback ARC
Page Count : 388
Genre : Mythology/Retelling
Publisher : Wildfire Books
Release Date : April 29, 2021

Reviewer : Micky
Rating  : ★ ★ ★ ★. 5


Micky’s 4. 5 star review

Headlines:
Feminist and sisterhood
Bittersweet
Betrayal
I’m so over Greek mythology men

I was captivated by the writing and story of Aridane’s world very quickly but honestly, don’t come into this story expecting gentleness. Ariadne was told with raw brutality at times, no holds barred and personally, I appreciated the gritty immersion. Please do check trigger warnings on other reviews or dm me for details.

The story was ladened with tragedy and also times of happiness but there was always that overwhelming sense of foreboding. It wasn’t a book that left you settled, it left me on edge and tense. Most of these feelings stemmed from the male characters in this book, mortal and god alike. Misogyny was rife but some of the key male characters were simply awful.

I had cried all the tears I thought I could ever produce; I had spat and screamed and now I felt strangely cleansed.

The separate stories of Ariadne and Phaedra were so interesting and I had such hopes for their presents, futures and their ability to deal with the past. The legacy of their experiences was a heavy burden and these sisters were close but driven apart by circumstances.

The tone of the story was broadly feminist with a sense of sisterhood at the heart of it. The children were also a balm to the tragedies. I’m not going to lie, I did struggle with the conclusion a little but it was true to the tale and to the tone of the book overall.

Ariadne was an immersive experience with the kind of writing that got you lost in the page. It was a truly impressive debut. The cover is stunning and I’ve ordered myself a finished copy. I can’t wait to see which story Jennifer Saint will retell next.

Thank you to Wildfire Books/Headline for the early review copy.

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