DAUGHTER OF THE FOREST by Juliet Marillier – rereading a favourite!

Lovely Sorcha is the seventh child and only daughter of Lord Colum of Sevenwaters. Bereft of a mother, she is comforted by her six brothers who love and protect her. Sorcha is the light in their lives, they are determined that she know only contentment.

But Sorcha’s joy is shattered when her father is bewitched by his new wife, an evil enchantress who binds her brothers with a terrible spell, a spell which only Sorcha can lift – by staying silent. If she speaks before she completes the quest set to her by the Fair Folk and their queen, the Lady of the Forest, she will lose her brothers forever.

When Sorcha is kidnapped by the enemies of Sevenwaters and taken to a foreign land, she is torn between the desire to save her beloved brothers, and a love that comes only once. Sorcha despairs at ever being able to complete her task, but the magic of the Fair Folk knows no boundaries, and love is the strongest magic of them all..


Title : Daughter of the Forest
Author : Juliet Marillier
Series : Sevenwaters (book one)
Format : physical
Page Count : 544
Genre : fantasy / historical fiction / retellings
Publisher : TorBooks
Release Date : March 14, 2001

Reviewer : Hollis
Rating : ★ ★ ★ ★ ★


Hollis’ 5 star review

We’ve talked on this blog before of rereading, and what inspires us to do so, and when we reach for favourites. I remember mentioning how my rereads tend to be done over the holidays, for nostalgia and comfort, but, yikes. This is no holiday, quite the opposite, but definitely a time for comfort and self-care. Even if this book put me through the wringer.

Most people can’t choose a favourite book; and rightly so. With so much choice, so much to love, it’s akin to picking a favourite child (though we all know those exist.. I see you, parents). But if you asked me? I would say DAUGHTER OF THE FOREST by Juliet Marillier. All of the original Sevenwaters books, actually, as it’s really just one long story.

If I were telling this tale, and it were not my own, I would give it a neat, satisfying ending. [..] In such stories, there are no loose ends. There are no unraveled edges and crooked threads. [..] But this was my own story.

There is something so magical about slipping into a favourite, particularly one you haven’t read in some time, and when the story itself is magical? The experience is so much more. This story is deeply moving. It’s a story of family, of loss, of tragedy and violence, healing and love, sacrifice and hope, and magic and wonder. It’s also one of the most perfect (in my opinion, obviously) portrayals of the complexity of dealing with the Fair Folk, who demand much of the mortals they encounter, who make bargains and promises, all in an effort to guide events and people to a desired end. No matter who gets hurt, or how, in the process.

This story isn’t always easy. The road Sorcha walks is treacherous, the task she must complete to reunite her family is unimaginable, and she is young and alone. Until she isn’t. At which point she’s among her enemies, far from home, and still darkness dogs her steps. But it’s her strength, her perseverance, even when faced with more tragedy, with uncertainty, even when tormented by her own doubt and despair, that is truly incredible.

Marillier’s prose is enchanting, resonating with emotion, and gorgeously descriptive. There are characters to love, and characters to hate, and though I’ve read this story countless times (seriously, I couldn’t even guess), I still dreaded certain events, I still wept; everything hit just as hard. And if that isn’t a sign of a great book, I don’t know what is. What made this particular reread even more special was being joined by a friend who experienced it all for the first time.

I have never tried to review this, all my reads predate the blog or my reviewing on GR, and I know I haven’t done this book any justice at all. It’s impossible to express my love for this book because it’s honestly so deeply embedded in my soul. I read this as a young human and it’s been with me, and I’ve relived it, over and over throughout the years, and we are irrevocably entwined. Some books you lose the love for other the years, as your taste or perspective or style as a reader changes. This book, this series, isn’t one of those.

Would I recommend? Absolutely. This story has something for everyone. Particularly if you’re a fan of fantasy, folklore, and retellings. Because this is all of that and more. And if you discover you don’t like it? That’s fine, we just can’t be friends — kidding.

Maybe.