MONTHLY WRAP UP – NOVEMBER 2021

To close out each month, we’ll be posting a break down of everything we reviewed, beginning with the reads we loved.. and ending with the reads we didn’t. Not only does this compile all our reviews in one handy summary for you to peruse, or catch up on, it also gives us an interesting birds eye view of the month and our reads. And maybe, even, our moods.


☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ star reads

Under the Whispering Door by TJ Klune — see Micky’s review here
The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood — see Micky’s review here

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ star reads

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin — see Hollis’ review here
The Broken Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin — see Hollis’ review here
Cracked by Eliza Crewe — see Hollis’ review here
Crushed by Eliza Crewe — see Hollis’ review here
Crossed by Eliza Crewe — see Hollis’ review here
The Kinsmen Universe by Ilona Andrews — see Micky’s review here
The Fastest Way to Fall by Denise Williams — see Micky’s review here
Year of the Reaper by Makiia Lucier — see Micky’s review here
House Swap by Olivia Beirne — see Micky’s review here
Fated Blades by Ilona Andrews — see Hollis’ review here
When Shadows Fall by Sita Brahmachari — see Micky’s review here
Iron Widow by Xiran Jay Zhou — see Micky’s review here

☆ ☆ ☆ star reads

Portrait of a Scotsman by Evie Dunmore — see Hollis’ review here
The Kingdom of Gods by N.K. Jemisin — see Hollis’ review here
The Ex Hex by Erin Sterling — see Hollis’ review here
The Bronzed Beasts by Roshani Chokshi — see Hollis’ review here
Summer Sons by Lee Mandelo — see Hollis’ review here
Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell — see Micky’s review here
Out Of The Blue by P. Dangelico — see Micky’s review here
Seer of Sevenwaters by Juliet Marillier — see Micky and Hollis’ reviews here
Gilded by Marissa Meyer — see Micky’s review here
Murder Most Actual by Alexis Hall — see Micky’s review here
Skin of the Sea by Natasha Bowen — see Micky’s review here

☆ ☆ star reads

star reads

You’ve Reached Sam by Dustin Thao — see Hollis’ review here

u n r a t e d

DNF


additional reads not reviewed for blog : The Girl With The Louding Voice, Covet, Seven Devils, A Memory of Summer, This Poison Heart
total reads by Micky : eighteen
favourite read of the month : Under the Whispering Door by TJ Klune
least favourite read of the month : Murder Most Actual by Alexis Hall
most read genre : SFF

total reviews by Hollis : thirteen
favourite read of the month : Soul Eaters series by Eliza Crewe
least favourite read of the month : You’ve Reached Sam by Dustin Thao
most read genre : fantasy

NEW RELEASE TUESDAY – NOVEMBER 30, 2021

Happy “where’d all my money go?” new release Tuesday, everyone!

As you know, the most exciting day of the week in this community is the day that follows the one we all dread (Mondays for the nope) and today we’re going to highlight some of the new books chipping away at our bank accounts — but each one is so worth it.


Wish You Were Here by Jodi Picoult was out in the UK on November 25, 2021, and is out everywhere else today.

Leviathan Falls by James S.A. Corey is the ninth and final book in the beloved The Expanse series. We are big fans of the show (which also has its final series airing in December!) and there may be a binge of these chonky sci-fi books in our future.

Girls of Fate and Fury by Natasha Ngan is another series finale which promises to be “stunningly beautiful and heartbreaking“.

Jade Legacy by Fonda Lee is yet another series finale and may inspire yet another binge (overdue!) of this East Asia-inspired fantasy saga ala The Godfather with intergenerational blood feuds, vicious politics, magic, and kungfu.



Are there any titles out today you’re excited for? Let us know in the comments below! 

ANTICIPATED DECEMBER 2021 RELEASES

Each month, we’ll be putting together a list of our top most anticipated releases; from romance, to sci-fi, to fantasy, and everything in between. These releases might be ones we’re counting down the days for or ones we’ve already read and want you to read (and love!), too.

What you do need to bear in mind is that living on different continents we have different release dates. So as a general rule there might be some repeats from one month to the next.. it’s not that we’re just being weird. Though we can’t dismiss that totally out of turn.


For December, our hotly anticipated titles, in chronological order, are :


Custody Battles by Gregory Ashe | December 3, 2021

This is a sequel so read the synopsis at your own peril!

Some parents would die for their children. Others will do a whole lot worse.

Emery Hazard and his husband, John-Henry Somerset, are settling into their new normal—at home, with the latest addition to their family, and at work, as Somers adapts to his new role and Hazard manages his expanding agency. The only thing Hazard is worried about is getting through dinner with his in-laws.

When his father-in-law requests that Hazard and Somers join him for a weekend deer hunting, it sounds simple enough: spend a night camping, give their foster son a chance to spend time with his friend, and—possibly—prevent a parental kidnapping. But nothing is ever as simple as it sounds. At deer camp, Hazard and Somers find themselves drawn into a toxic family feud between parents battling for custody.

After the husband is shot and killed deep in the forest, detectives from the Sheriff’s Department are convinced that the killer is a local extremist—a member of the neo-Nazi Ozark Volunteers. Hazard and Somers, though, aren’t so sure, and as they probe deeper into the killing, they find that many people had a reason to want the victim dead, and the killing itself might not be what it seems.

Then a drive-by shooting almost claims the lives of Hazard, Somers, and the victim’s wife. The killer’s work isn’t done, and Hazard and Somers must race to find the truth before the killer strikes again.

If This Gets Out by Sophie Gonzales & Cale Dietrich | December 7, 2021

Eighteen-year-olds Ruben Montez and Zach Knight are two members of the boy-band Saturday, one of the biggest acts in America. Along with their bandmates, Angel Phan and Jon Braxton, the four are teen heartbreakers in front of the cameras and best friends backstage. But privately, cracks are starting to form: their once-easy rapport is straining under the pressures of fame, and Ruben confides in Zach that he’s feeling smothered by management’s pressure to stay in the closet.

On a whirlwind tour through Europe, with both an unrelenting schedule and minimal supervision, Ruben and Zach come to rely on each other more and more, and their already close friendship evolves into a romance. But when they decide they’re ready to tell their fans and live freely, Zach and Ruben start to truly realize that they will never have the support of their management. How can they hold tight to each other when the whole world seems to want to come between them?

The Righteous by Renée Ahdieh | December 7, 2021

This is a sequel so read the synopsis at your own peril!

The third book in the instant New York Times bestselling series that began with The Beautiful.

Pippa Montrose is tired of losing everything she loves. When her best friend Celine disappears under mysterious circumstances, Pippa resolves to find her, even if the journey takes her into the dangerous world of the fae, where she might find more than she bargained for in the charismatic Arjun Desai.

Renée is back with her rich, atmospheric fantasy world that will continue to enthrall readers, new romance and mystery, and lush, pacey writing.

A Marvellous Light by Freya Marske | December 9, 2021

Red White & Royal Blue meets Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell in debut author Freya Marske’s A Marvellous Light, featuring an Edwardian England full of magic, contracts, and conspiracies. 

Robin Blyth has more than enough bother in his life. He’s struggling to be a good older brother, a responsible employer, and the harried baronet of a seat gutted by his late parents’ excesses. When an administrative mistake sees him named the civil service liaison to a hidden magical society, he discovers what’s been operating beneath the unextraordinary reality he’s always known.

Now Robin must contend with the beauty and danger of magic, an excruciating deadly curse, and the alarming visions of the future that come with it—not to mention Edwin Courcey, his cold and prickly counterpart in the magical bureaucracy, who clearly wishes Robin were anyone and anywhere else.

Robin’s predecessor has disappeared, and the mystery of what happened to him reveals unsettling truths about the very oldest stories they’ve been told about the land they live on and what binds it. Thrown together and facing unexpected dangers, Robin and Edwin discover a plot that threatens every magician in the British Isles—and a secret that more than one person has already died to keep.

Here’s To Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera | December 28, 2021

This is the series finale so read the synopsis at your own peril!

Ben has spent his first year of college working on his fantasy manuscript with his writing partner Mario, who is a great Spanish tutor, and an even better kisser. So why can’t he stop thinking about the fact that Arthur’s back in town two years after they called it quits?

Arthur is in New York for a dream internship on Broadway, with a boyfriend back at home that he couldn’t be happier with. But when he comes upon Ben cuddled up with a mystery boy, he starts to wonder if his feelings for Ben ever truly went away. 

Even as the boys try to focus on their futures, they can’t seem to help running into each other in the present. Is the universe forcing them to question if they’re actually meant to be?

Possibly not. After all, things didn’t work the first time around.
Possibly yes. After all, the sparks are still flying.
Sometimes you just have to take a leap of faith and raise a glass.

Here’s to celebrating old friends!
Here’s to embracing new beginnings!
Here’s to believing in second chances!


What titles are you looking forward to this month? Let us know in the comments below!

CROSSED by Eliza Crewe

War is here.

Full-scale war has erupted between the Crusaders and demons and even Chi has to admit isn’t going well. Like any sensible rat, Meda’s eager to abandon the sinking ship but, unfortunately, her friends aren’t nearly as pragmatic. Instead, Meda’s forced to try to keep them all alive until the dust settles.

As the Crusaders take more and more drastic measures, the tables turn and Meda suddenly finds herself in the role of voice of sanity. No one is more horrified than she is. When old enemies reappear as new allies and old friends become new enemies Meda has to decide—again—whose side she’s really on.

And then the Crusaders decide that Meda should go to Hell. Literally.

Can’t a monster ever catch a break?


Title : Crossed
Author : Eliza Crewe
Series : Soul Eaters (book three)
Format : eBook
Page Count : 346
Genre : YA paranormal fantasy
Publisher : Strange Chemistry
Release Date : August 13, 2015

Reviewer : Hollis
Rating : ★ ★ ★ ★  


Hollis’ 4 star review

I definitely expected this ending to be unexpected but the fact that it was also delightful and delicious? So good.

I have seen too much good in my enemies, too much evil in my allies.

Obviously there’s even less I can say about this finale than the books that came before because I in no way want to spoil the surprises that await you. But just know.. they await. Patiently.

It’s this, my own depravity, that makes me unable to condemn others for theirs, that makes me want to believe that no matter what mistakes I make, that there is forgiveness. There is hope.

This series has a snarky hilarious narrative built around our not-at-all innocent soul eater, a half demon, Meda. It has strong female friendships that are complicated by differences and realness but endure nonetheless. It has an interesting and complex romantic element that constantly surprised me. It has darkness and violence but also hope and light. And so much more.

Just as the Crusaders are plagued with hate, demons are afflicted with hope. The equal opposite nature of the cosmic game board means no one is above reproach, and no one is below it.

If you’re looking to beef up your backlist reading, you love YA, and you enjoy a twist on the usual formula; if you love to revel in some excellent dialogue around good and evil, the truths we avoid and the lies we tell ourselves, no matter what side we’re on, this would be a high recommend from me.



KINGDOM OF GODS by N.K. Jemisin

For two thousand years the Arameri family has ruled the world by enslaving the very gods that created mortalkind. Now the gods are free, and the Arameris’ ruthless grip is slipping. Yet they are all that stands between peace and world-spanning, unending war. 


Title : Kingdom of Gods
Author : N.K. Jemisin
Series : Inheritance Trilogy (book three)
Format : eBook (overdrive)
Page Count : 613
Genre : fantasy
Publisher : Orbit
Release Date : October 11, 2011

Reviewer : Hollis
Rating : ★ ★ ★  


Hollis’ 3 star review

I’m trying not to be bummed because three stars is still a good rating (and I think I’m an outlier, on a brief scan of ratings on GR) but this just didn’t satisfy me the way books one and two did.

I’ve mentioned in my other review that the way book two fit into book one was different but still connected. Well that trend continues with book three but this one steps even further away from the major themes that connected those earlier instalments. This one also shifts gears in the particular perspective we follow.

Regardless of my liking of it, though, it’s impossible to argue against the fact that Jemisin did really interesting things with this. We really delved into the meat of her world, her characters, and the division between her mortals and her gods and all from the perspective of a character we’ve grown to love up until this point. But while I appreciated some new facets to him, and again a better understanding of the way it all worked, I think the problem was I just wasn’t as compelled by him; or the new characters we met along the way.

But again, it was all interesting.

It can’t be said Jemisin isn’t creative as hell and what she does with her concepts, the narratives and explorations, not to mention her late stage reveals, are just brilliant. And while I dragged my feet a bit, and didn’t love the (long) journey of this one every step of the way, I did actually like the ending. It’s such a change from where we started and I love that.

And it’s not over! I actually have two novellas still to complete but I don’t think I’ll do much reviewing of them unless they blow me away. So thus concludes the last series on my latest Five On Our TBRs list. Super glad I gave myself the push to get through this and don’t regret a single moment of it. If you’ve read to read Jemisin, if you’ve yet to read this debut series of hers, don’t delay. I highly recommend.

SPOTLIGHT AND AUTHOR Q&A about WHEN SHADOWS FALL by Sita Brahmachari

Micky here. I jumped at the chance of getting involved in reading When Shadows Fall by Sita Brahmachari as soon as I read the synopsis. The publisher (Little Tiger) and PR (the brilliant Nina Douglas) were asking for bloggers to choose a theme from the book and ask questions at a live reading/Q&A. When Shadows Fall is stunningly illustrated book about family, friendships, found family, prejudice, grief & loss, community, green spaces and being powerless until…but in reality, the reading of this book is a whole experiences of living alongside these characters.

When Shadows Fall and a signed copy of the artwork by Natalie Sirett

Today’s post is a little different. I’m going to be sharing the synopsis and my brief thoughts further down with details about the book, but I’m also going to be sharing Sita’s answers to my questions of grief & loss in relation to this book and YA lit in particular. I have a professional interest in grief experiences, especially those in children and young people, so I was so pleased to see these themes handled so brilliantly in the book and then hear Sita’s perspectives.


Sita’s passion and knowledge of the themes in this book in relation to real-world experiences just sang through her online meet. Sita was very chatty and down to earth, I was glued to my screen. When Shadows Fall had been 20 years in the making, from conceiving the idea to then getting pen to page. She described this story as being about ‘soul friends’ and I can’t tell you how that hits the nail on the head after reading this. Sita said that if there’s one thing she’d like readers, especially young people to take away from this book, it is the importance of agency for disenfranchised people. This whole book leads you to that, as Kai writes his story and we read it.

Shelfie of When Shadows Fall

Q&A about grief and loss in this book and YA lit

Micky: Why do you think it’s important for children & young people to have stories of grief?
Sita: This isn’t the first time I’ve written about grief and loss but this book is harder hitting in this theme than some of my others. Children live in the world and they need these stories, we do a disservice in storytelling if this isn’t part of the stories we tell. In this story, Omid has great grief to deal with but Kai also is going through a loss of his own.

Micky: Are there any other books you’d recommend on these topics?
Sita: I was influenced by Max Porter (Grief is the Thing with Feathers) and I’d recommend Annabel Pitcher’s My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece. Sita’s own Kite Spirit delves into these topics too, particularly suicide.

Micky: How do you think images, the illustrations in the book help children process thinking about grief and loss?
Sita: The ravens are a key element of this story and the thread of grief. Images can transport the reader, it adds to the texture of the book and how it’s understood.

The images in this book range from full illustrations for the page and also little pieces of art across so many pages that take a word like ‘bubbles’ and there are bubbles rising across the page. Those elements were so beautiful to me, making the reading experience incredibly special.

Thank you so much for answering my questions, Sita.


Synopsis

Kai, Orla and Zak grew up together, their days spent on the patch of wilderness in between their homes, a small green space in a sprawling grey city. Music, laughter and friendship bind them together and they have big plans for their future – until Kai’s family suffers a huge loss.

Trying to cope with his own grief, as well as watching it tear his family apart, Kai is drawn into a new and more dangerous crowd, until his dreams for the future are a distant memory. Excluded from school and retreating from his loved ones, it seems as though his path is set, his story foretold. Orla, Zak and new classmate Om are determined to help him find his way back. But are they too late?

A heart-breaking and poignant novel from award-winning author Sita Brahmachari, for fans of THE BLACK FLAMINGO, AND THE STARS WERE BURNING BRIGHTLY and POET X.


Micky’s review

Headlines:
Growing up
Life hurts
Emotionally charged

This read was an emotional experience but I knew that as I entered. The story centred around Kai and his family but really it was about growing up, friendships and a whole bite of tough life experiences. The story was written in the main through normal narrative, from the POV of Kai, Om, Orla and Zak but there were also moments of free verse that were incredibly poignant.

This was an empowering story but it was also packed with difficult themes such as mental illness, death, grief and refugee trauma and experiences. These themes were conveyed authentically and carefully by the author. Nevertheless, the words packed hefty emotional punches at times. I had to pause and take a break before I continued on because these words had the power to make me feel deeply.

The illustrations woven throughout the book were full of significance and poignancy. They ranged from double page spreads to small illustrations in the corner of a page. They made me stop and absorb and they were completely wonderful.

I would highly recommend this book for any teenager and above. Thank you to Little Tiger and Nina Douglas PR for the review copy.


Sita was born in Derby in 1966, to an Indian doctor from Kolkata and an English nurse from the Lake District. She has a BA in English Literature and an MA in Arts Education. Her many projects and writing commissions have been produced in theatres, universities, schools and community groups throughout Britain and America. ARTICHOKE HEARTS is her first novel for young people and won the prestigious Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize for 2011. Sita lives and works in North London with her husband, three children and a temperamental cat.

Thank you to Little Tiger & Nina Douglas PR for the gifted review copy and artwork (which I’m treasuring). Also thanks to Sita Brahmachari for being such an interesting author to talk to. Congratulations on an amazing book!

SKIN OF THE SEA by Natasha Bowen

An unforgettable fantasy debut inspired by West African mythology, this is Children of Blood and Bone meets The Little Mermaid, in which a mermaid takes on the gods themselves.

A way to survive.
A way to serve.
A way to save.

Simi prayed to the gods, once. Now she serves them as Mami Wata–a mermaid–collecting the souls of those who die at sea and blessing their journeys back home.

But when a living boy is thrown overboard, Simi does the unthinkable–she saves his life, going against an ancient decree. And punishment awaits those who dare to defy it.

To protect the other Mami Wata, Simi must journey to the Supreme Creator to make amends. But something is amiss. There’s the boy she rescued, who knows more than he should. And something is shadowing Simi, something that would rather see her fail. . . .

Danger lurks at every turn, and as Simi draws closer, she must brave vengeful gods, treacherous lands, and legendary creatures. Because if she doesn’t, then she risks not only the fate of all Mami Wata, but also the world as she knows it.


Title : Skin of the Sea
Author : Natasha Bowen
Format : Physical ARC
Page Count : 323
Genre : YA Fantasy
Publisher : Penguin
Release Date : November 4, 2021

Reviewer : Micky
Rating : ★ ★ ★


Micky’s 3 star review

Headlines:
West African fantasy wow
Slavery and fighting back
Lush cover

I’m blown away by the cover on this book, it is stunning and provides such a fantastic visual for Simi the main character. I really bought into this story initially, Simi being a mermaid-esque being but able to transform to human on land. Her job was to collect the souls of those dying at sea, particularly slaves killed on the boats taking them away from their native shores.

I really loved the early elements of the folk lore& gods but it did get more complicated and a bit harder to follow at times. It wasn’t a long book but the second half felt a little longer than it should have to me. Kola, the human alongside Simi had a joint quest to fulfill with Simi and that premise for the story was interesting but again with a rather complex set of gods and magical elements to follow.

I liked this book but sadly I didn’t love it like I thought I might. I’d definitely read this author again however and I really appreciated the slavery perspective and generally the African fantasy context.

Please check out some black reviewers on this book. Thanks to the publisher for the ARC through netgalley.

MURDER MOST ACTUAL by Alexis Hall

From the author of Boyfriend Material and Rosaline Palmer Takes the Cake comes a cozy mystery that revisits the Golden Age of detective fiction, starring a heroine who’s more podcaster than private eye and topped with a lethal dose of parody — perfect for fans of Clue, Knives Out, and Only Murders in the Building!

When up-and-coming true crime podcaster Liza and her corporate financier wife Hanna head to a luxurious hotel in the Scottish Highlands, they’re hoping for a chance to rekindle their marriage – not to find themselves trapped in the middle of an Agatha Christie-esque murder mystery with no way home. But who better to take on the case than someone whose entire profession relies on an obsession with all things mysterious and macabre? Though some of her fellow guests may consider her an interfering new media hack, Liza knows a thing or two about crime and – despite Hanna’s preference for waiting out the chaos behind a locked door – might be the only one capable of discovering the killer. As the bodies rack up and the stakes rise, can they save their marriage — and their lives?


Title : Murder Most Actual
Author : Alexis Hall
Format : eARC
Page Count : 302
Genre : Cosy Mystery/LGBTQIAP+
Publisher : Kobo Original
Release Date : November 9, 2021

Reviewer :  Micky
Rating : ★ ★ ★


Micky’s 3 star review

Headlines:
Marriage on the rocks
Murders around every corner
Banter for days

Cosy mysteries aren’t really my thing but Alexis Hall’s books are totally my thing, so I thought I’d give this read a try. I liked it, but I didn’t love it.

Murder Most Actual was purposely farcical and far fetched but the characters, particularly Liza and Hanna had you buying into the story. The dialogue and banter between these two was honestly hilarious and had me laughing out loud numerous times. I enjoyed the background depiction of a marriage stalled and their attempts to find their way back to common ground. The murders pretty much thwarted this plan though.

“Did you not hear the scream?”
“Yes, I heard the scream.” Hanna was giving her a what-the-fuck look.
“That’s why I’m staying in bed.”

The cast of characters were an eclectic mix to put it mildly with only Hanna and Liza likeable. As bodies began to fall, working out the perpetrator was on the one hand, simple and on the other hand, more complex than I thought. Expect to be stretched to ridiculous ends and just go with the flow.

I loved the chapter headings, cluedo-style. While this cosy mystery didn’t always float my boat, Alexis Hall brought his signature humour to the table and made me like it more than I would have without his wit and intelligence behind the pen.

Thank you to Kobo/netgalley for the early review copy.

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/murder-most-actual

THE LOVE HYPOTHESIS by Ali Hazelwood

When a fake relationship between scientists meets the irresistible force of attraction, it throws one woman’s carefully calculated theories on love into chaos.

As a third-year Ph.D. candidate, Olive Smith doesn’t believe in lasting romantic relationships but her best friend does, and that’s what got her into this situation. Convincing Anh that Olive on her way to a happily ever after was always going to be tough, scientists require proof. So, like any self-respecting woman, Olive panics and kisses the first man she sees.

That man is none other than Adam Carlsen, a young hotshot professor and well-known ass. Which is why Olive is positively floored when he agrees to keep her charade a secret and be her fake boyfriend. But when a big science conference goes haywire and Adam surprises her again with his unyielding support (and his unyielding abs), their little experiment feels dangerously close to combustion.

Olive soon discovers that the only thing more complicated than a hypothesis on love is putting her own heart under the microscope.


Title : The Love Hypothesis
Author : Ali Hazelwood
Format : Paperback
Page Count : 384
Genre : Contemporary Romance
Publisher : Piatkus
Release Date : September 27, 2021

Reviewer :  Micky
Rating : ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 


Micky’s 5 star review

Headlines:
Awkward equals awesome
Tentative growing feelings
Consumed every word

I inhaled every word of this book as best I could over 24 hours with a work day in the middle, but if I could have done, I would have read this front to back without a break. It really was unputdownable.

This contemporary romance set in academia and around PhD programmes in STEM was so much fun for me because so much of it resonated, even though my PhD programme didn’t have so much excitement. The life of an academic was so true to life, the pressures, the pedanticness, the politics and good bits too. There were a lot of funny details that were all so real to me, jokes that hit the funny bone. I loved seeing this world in the background of a fantastic story with engaging characters.

…but academia was a lawless land.

These two, Olive and Adam were all quirk and awkwarness. From that kiss on the cover, to the uncomfortable realisation of feelings, was brilliantly writtten with endearing characterisation. Adam the ass of a supervisor, brought a genuine and honest side of himself to Olive from the beginning. Olive was a sometimes chaotic and always committed student, who was in the fake relationship for the sugar.

The plot was interesting in every moment, even through the uncomfortable themes that arose. I didn’t want the story to end but I appreciated the smiles that crossed my face when reading. Also did I mention the heat? Yeah, that was great.

Thank you Piatkus for the review copy of this now firm 2021 favourite.

NEW RELEASE TUESDAY – NOVEMBER 23, 2021

Happy “where’d all my money go?” new release Tuesday, everyone!

As you know, the most exciting day of the week in this community is the day that follows the one we all dread (Mondays for the nope) and today we’re going to highlight some of the new books chipping away at our bank accounts — but each one is so worth it.


Go Tell The Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon is the ninth (!) book in the long running Outlander series and marks the first release in almost ten years. Sheesh. Who else needs a reread?

Fated Blades by Ilona Andrews and.. oh, you stopped reading after Ilona? Us too. Who even cares what these authors are publishing; we’ll be reading it.
(incase you’re curious though it’s a new novella in their Kinsmen universe).

Cytonic by Brandon Sanderson is the third book in the Skyward series (trilogy?) “about a girl who will travel beyond the stars to save the world she loves from destruction.



Are there any titles out today you’re excited for? Let us know in the comments below! 

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