THE SEVEN HUSBANDS OF EVELYN HUGO by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Aging and reclusive Hollywood movie icon Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life.

When she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one in the journalism community is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now? Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband, David, has left her, and her career has stagnated. Regardless of why Evelyn has chosen her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jumpstart her career.

Summoned to Evelyn’s Upper East Side apartment, Monique listens as Evelyn unfurls her story: from making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the late 80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way. As Evelyn’s life unfolds—revealing a ruthless ambition, an unexpected friendship, and a great forbidden love—Monique begins to feel a very a real connection to the actress. But as Evelyn’s story catches up with the present, it becomes clear that her life intersects with Monique’s own in tragic and irreversible ways.



Title : The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo
Author : Taylor Jenkins Reid
Format : eBook (overdrive)
Page Count : 402
Genre : contemporary / historical / LGBTQIAP+ romance
Publisher : Washington Square Press
Release Date : June 13, 2017

Reviewer : Hollis
Rating : unrated



Hollis’ unrated review

Yep, we’re doing this unrated thing again. Because I don’t know how to feel.

Sure, I’m getting out of a slump. Sure, the world is bouncing back — in part — from something awful, and that offers much distraction. And sure, life is kind of terrible right now. But. I still don’t think that impacted this read as much as I wish it had.

I like you impure and scrappy and formidable. I like the Evelyn Hugo who sees the world for what it is and then goes out there and wrestles what she wants out of it.

At first I thought I was just struggling with the character in the contemporary timeline. I didn’t like her at the beginning and didn’t like her at the end and she doesn’t offer up much in the middle so it doesn’t count. But just when I thought I would be trading in my like, and my fascination, of Evelyn into love.. it didn’t quite go that way.

You have worked so hard for a life so grand. And now all you want are the smallest freedoms. The daily peace of loving plainly.

I appreciate, and respect, that TJR wrote complicated women in this story. And there’s nothing wrong with finding a person, man OR woman, hard to love. But compounded by so many things, one of which was the drama, it was a lot. Reading of the struggles of queer people, of wanting to be part of the Stonewall riots, particularly in today’s climate, though? The struggles with identity, both in race and orientation, it all hits so hard. And feels very close. A lot of this, I think, was well done; though I don’t have a stake in either so my opinion means little. But it felt tangible. Heavy. But I kept waiting for an emotional connection and it never landed. Maybe it was the writing. Maybe it was just the Too Much of it all. I don’t know.

You do not know how fast you have been running, how hard you have been working, how truly exhausted you are, until someone stands behind you and says, “it’s okay, you can fall down now. I’ll catch you”

I am happy to have been pulled out of the world for a bit. I was wonderfully and totally distracted for a few hours. And I love that this book means so much to so many people and is out there doing so much for so many. I’m sad I’m not one of them. But don’t let this deter you. If you’re one of the handful of others still to read this? I still think you should pick it up.

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